World Series of Poker Betting Odds 2014

October has reached its midway point and that means that the November Nine will soon be seated to play out the final table of the 2014 WSOP Main Event. On the line for the winner will be a $10 million first-place prize and the coveted championship bracelet.

Current odds at most sportsbooks have the players handicapped based on chip stack and playing experience. As expected the chip leader Jorryt van Hoof (38,375,000 chips) has the smallest payday, currently listed with WSOP odds of 57/20 at Bovada, or 2.85/1. The Netherlands native has been cashing in live tournaments since 2005, but his 2014 WSOP November Nine appearance has been his biggest one to date.

The player with the second biggest chip stack is Norwegian Felix Stephensen with 32,775,000 in chips. He is relatively inexperienced and will pay 4/1 at Bovada for takers if he’s able to take down the event. With only two other live tournament cashes, Stephensen will likely need to have the deck on his side to come out on top.

At WSOP November Nine odds of 5/1 at Bovada is back-to-back November Nine participant Mark Newhouse. This poker pro has won over $3.5 million playing live tournaments including a WPT championship for a $1.5 million payday back in 2006. Newhouse gets another chance at the November Nine after going out in ninth place last year.

The rest of the November Nine odds are currently handicapped at Bovada at:

Jorryt van Hoof (38,375,000 Chips) 57/20
Felix Stephensen (32,775,000 Chips) 4/1
Mark Newhouse (26,000,000 Chips) 5/1
Andoni Larrabe (22,550,000 Chips) 7/1
Dan Sindelar (21,200,000 Chips) 15/2
Martin Jacobson (14,900,000 Chips) 8/1
Will Pappaconstantinou (17,500,000 Chips) 10/1
William Tonking (15,050,000 Chips) 12/1
Bruno Politano (12,125,000 Chips) 16/1

Some books are also offering prop action on the WSOP November Nine. Currently WSOP odds at Bovada on an American player winning the main event are handicapped at +150, while action on any other nationality winning is at -200. Four players in the November Nine are American.

The November nine will resume play on November 10 and will run for two days if necessary. ESPN will once again have coverage of the event.

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Americans have home-table advantage at the World Series of Poker and odds are good that an American will be the 2014 WSOP champion.

Online poker room Bovada posted odds this week, just ahead of the 2014 WSOP events which kick off in Las Vegas. It made an American winner the -175 moneyline favorite position.

The full WSOP schedule includes 65 events this year, ending with the $10,000 No Limit Hold’em World Championship Main Event.

This year’s Main Event gets underway on July 5 after a record 6,352 players staked $10,000 for their dream of winning $10M in prizes and the WSOP gold bracelet. The past two champions have been Americans, who traditionally represent the bulk of the entrants.

The odds are much steeper against a past champion even making the Final Table, let alone winning the gruelling event. A ‘yes’ answer is a +600 longshot for bettors who think a past champ will make the November Nine.

And while women have come very close to making the cut for the November Nine the past two years, Bovada made this a -2000 bet that no women will join the men at the Final Table.

The book also posted on odds on what the winning hand will be and on the age of the next champion. The event has become a test of youth, with no recent winners over the age of 27 (which is the over-under for this bet).

What will be the country of birth of the 2014 WSOP Main Event Champion?

USA -175
Rest of the World +135

Will a former Main Event winner make the final table of the 2014 WSOP Main Event?

Yes +600
No -1200

Will a female make it to the final table of the 2014 WSOP Main Event?

Yes +900
No -2000

How old will be the winner of the 2014 WSOP Main Event (on day of final hand)?

27 Years or older -140
26 Years 364 days or younger EVEN

What will be the winning/final hand at the 2014 WSOP Main Event?

2 pair or better -150
1 pair or lower +110

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