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Watch: Tricky Gus Hansen Loses $44k Pot on Poker After Dark

The poker world just isn’t the same without notorious wild man Gus “The Great Dane” Hansen and he proved it yet again with a crazy hand on Poker After Dark this week.

Hansen has been somewhat absent from the international poker circuit over the last few years but he returned to the scene this summer and played in the big cash games in Bobby’s Room at Bellagio.

It just so happened that poker streaming service PokerGO televised a series of cash games featuring Bobby’s Room regulars this week (which the site branded “Godfather Week” thanks to the inclusion of poker icon Doyle Brunson) and Hansen couldn’t stay away.

Hansen is renowned for his legendary loose plays and he pulled one against fellow pro Brian Rast with disastrous results.

The Set-Up

Where to start with this one?

You don’t see many poker pros mixing it up with 5-2 but, then again, that’s what makes Gus Hansen so special. It’s a sharp contrast to Brian Rast, who was on pocket kings in the hand.

To properly set the stage, the game was Limit Hold’em with blinds of $1,500/$3,000 and a $50,000 buy-in. The game was six-handed with noted pros Doyle Brunson and Scott Seiver on hand for the action.

Hansen went into the hand with just over $110,000 in his stack while Rast had him easily covered with around $300,000.

The Great Dane decided to open things up for a bet from late position with a paltry 5-2 offsuit and Rast made the easy 3-bet. Hansen decided to call and boost the pot up to $11,500 as they headed to the flop.

“Did I see this right?!” exclaimed commentator Nick Schulman about Hansen’s modest hole cards.

The flop went Hansen’s way, however, with 7-2-2 rainbow. Hansen decided to get tricky and check his monster to Rast, who threw $1,500 into the pot. Hansen responded by check-raising to $3,000.

Rast called and the dealer peeled off the king of spades as the dramatic turn card.

Hansen made the big bet of $3,000 but Rast decided to just call this time around and the board finished with the ace of diamonds on the river.

Hansen fired a bet of $3,000 but Rast immediately raised to $6,000 to which Hansen re-popped it to $9,000. Finally Rast made it $12,000 and Hansen exclaimed, “No, you didn’t do that. Aw, that’s so sad.”

The Great Dane was getting great odds to call but eventually decided to lay down his hand. Rast threw his kings into the muck and collected the $44,500 pot.

Summary

This is a Gus Hansen hand through and through. You generally don’t expect to see much 5-2 offsuit at this level.

It’s difficult to get inside the mind of Hansen but he definitely sees the value in mixing things up and showing a different style of play at the table.

It also bears repeating that this hand was played in Limit Hold’em, not the usual No-Limit, so it plays a little differently than most poker fans might expect.

Hansen criticized himself aloud for not just calling on the river but it’s worth noting that he did escape further damage with the eventual laydown despite the incredible odds he was getting to call. It’s a sick spot, for sure.

Godfather Week on PokerGO

This is the first time that PokerGO has hosted Godfather Week and it’s an amazing inside look at one of the biggest regularly occurring poker games on the planet.

While the vast majority of poker players these days are only interested in No-Limit Hold’em, the big game at Bobby’s Room has always utilized the mixed games like 8-game, H.O.R.S.E. and 2-7 Triple Draw.

While games like Razz and Omaha-8 are not as inherently sexy as NLHE, Godfather Week on PokerGO is a fantastic way for new players to expand their portfolio of poker games.

Mixed games like H.O.R.S.E. have seen very little action on television because the cards are somewhat harder to display on TV and most poker fans are only interested in No-Limit Hold’em.

Godfather Week is now complete but PokerGO subscribers can access the Poker After Dark archives at any point they want. It’s worth doing for any player who’s ever wondered exactly what happens behind the fabled frosted-glass doors in Bellagio’s poker room.

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