Odds Shark Top ESports Sites
*Terms and Conditions apply to all bonus offers on this website. Visit operator for details.

Rogue, Maru Top Odds at DreamHack SC2 Masters

Dreamhack masters sc2 logo
Dreamhack

Starcraft action is finally returning to our screens with DreamHack Masters kicking off on July 1 and bringing us a weekend full of competitive SC2.

This event also marks the start of the ESL Pro Tour 2021-22 season, meaning that alongside a $50,000 prize pool, players will also be fighting for all-important Pro Tour circuit points.

Before we take a closer look at the event, make sure to familiarize yourself with How to Bet on Starcraft 2!

Who’s Playing at DreamHack SC2 Masters Summer Finals?

We’ll see 16 of the best Starcraft 2 players in the world battling it out at DH Masters. This includes current GSL champion Rogue, European favorites Reynor and Clem, North American hopes Scarlett and Neeb, as well as a few wild cards from minor regions like China, SEA and Oceania.

Overall, it’s a strong spread of players, and Korea has in total secured six slots, which always makes for a competitive tournament as the country houses the best SC2 players in the world.

When it comes to the event itself, we see a pretty standard format. The players are first split into four groups of four and play in a GSL format, meaning winners face winners and losers face losers and the first players to get two wins advance.

Then, we move on to an eight-player single-elimination bracket where just one series loss spells elimination. We do, however, see a slight change in the grand final, as we get treated to a lengthy best-of-seven.

Odds to Win DreamHack Masters SC2
PlayerOdds
Rogue+300
Maru+350
Trap+400
Clem+400
Reynor+500
Zest+800
Innovation+1000
Dream+1500
Neeb+3500
HeroMarine+5000
Special+6600
Time+6600
Lambo+6600
Scarlett+25000
Nice+50000
Probe+100000

Odds as of June 16 at Betway

Rogue Looks For Back-to-Back Trophies

The reigning Global Starcraft League champion will be out in full force at DreamHack Masters, aiming to continue his strong run of form. After years of consistently strong performances, Rogue has earned the title of best Zerg player in the world and is definitely in contention for the overall best player at the moment.

His recent GSL triumph was an incredible showing of skill, where he destroyed favorite Maru 4-1 in the grand finals. Other than that, he’s also seen a ton of strong online results, including winning three minor cups in a row, as well as placing third at the Super Tournament.

Overall, Rogue definitely looks to be the strongest player coming into the event and he’s definitely earned the title of favorite.

Can Maru Finally Win?

While Rogue is the best Zerg player, Maru is by far the best Terran. He’s a Starcraft 2 prodigy who first joined a pro team and rivaled the best players when he was just 12 years old. It’s been 11 years since then and at 23 he’s still one of the younger competitors in SC2, despite having over a decade of professional experience.

Between his raw skill, insane amounts of experience and a slight advantage in being younger than most players at this event, it’s easy to see why Maru rivals Rogue so heavily.

The Terran star is already one of the most decorated players in the game, but has seen a rough patch lately. His last major tournament win came way back in March 2020 and he’s seen his path littered with second- and third-place finishes since.

He showed some very strong form at this most recent event, GSL, where he bowed out second to Rogue. Now he’s got another good shot at finally overcoming the final hurdle and ending his trophy drought.

Is There Hope For The West?

So far, we’ve described the two biggest favorites as almost unstoppable forces in Starcraft 2 and this is quite true. The best players in the world have always been from Korea and we currently have two Korean stars in hot form entering as strong favorites. It’s difficult to see anyone stopping them.

Historically, the West (in Starcraft’s case, any country that isn’t Korea) has struggled at international events. However, the last few years have seen the likes of Serral, Reynor and Clem rise up and bring Europe into international tournament glory.

In 2020, we actually saw tight competition. Of seven international events, Europeans won three, while Koreans won four. If we see this trend continue into this year, then there’s actually a solid shot that we might see an upset here, with Reynor and Clem being the two most likely players to pull it off.